Spring 2017 color trend

Holographic.  Iridescent.  Duo-chrome.  Prismatic.  Whatever you want to call it, this spring's color trend isn't a color at all, but as with fall 2015 , a particular finish.  I have to admit I haven't seen it at the high-fashion level, i.e. none of the spring 2017 fashion shows or magazines featured it.  However, after sifting through a lot of runway coverage and the spring issues of all 8 of the magazines I subscribe to, I still wasn't seeing any one color in particular standing out.  Despite talk of peach being all the rage and millennial pink taking center stage, neither of those seemed to be clear winners.  Thus, I went with what I know best and restricted my color trend choice to products aimed at the masses rather than those found on the runways.  As I predicted in January, the holographic makeup trend is still on fire this spring.  When you take into account how many of these color-shifting goodies were released last year (most of which I purchased in my never-ending quest to pretend I'm a mermaid), the sheer number of products continuing to be offered this spring is astonishing.

Spring 2017 trend: holographic

  1. Too-Faced  Love Light Prismatic Highlighter in Ray of Light
  2. Stila Magnificent Metals Glitter and Glow Liquid Eye Shadow in Sea Siren (I'm loving this!!)
  3. Laura Mercier Lightstruck Prismatic Glow Palette
  4. Kevyn Aucoin Cyber Sky
  5. Tarte Spellbound Glow Rainbow Highlighter
  6. Cover FX Custom Enhancer Drops in Halo (loving these!)
  7. Becca Shimmering Skin Perfector in Prismatic Amethyst (this one is awesome too)
  8. NARS Duo Eyeshadow in Thessalonique (um, yeah, I bought this as well and it's sooo pretty)
  9. Urban Decay Vice Special Effects Topcoat in 3rd Degree
  10. Bite Beauty Prismatic Pearl Gloss in Oyster
  11. Pat McGrath Labs Eye Gloss in Cyber (from the upcoming Dark Star 006 kit - can't wait!)

It got me thinking about why these shades are having a moment now.  After all, iridescent makeup isn't new, not to mention that we haven't even been seeing much prismatic magic in the way of fashion - usually fashion trends spill over into the beauty world - so I'm curious to know why it exploded in the past year or so.  Heck, holographic even spread to interior design and accessories.  Fortunately, Racked had a great article that explores the history of what the author calls "unicorn" makeup (although I'd argue that mermaid makeup is basically interchangeable when describing the trend) and why we can't get enough of it right now.  I'm incline to agree with her conclusions, which state that the current craze is partially a backlash against the no-makeup makeup look that was THE reigning trend a couple of years ago, and that it's also a response to the turbulent political climate.  Color-shifting, dreamy makeup that reminds us of mythical beings we loved as children (and in my case, still obsessed with) is very comforting when the world seems to have gone to hell in a handbasket.  The author of another excellent piece examining the iridescent frenzy within the sphere of interior design concurs:  while some of the reasons it took off in home goods and furniture are different than for makeup (new technology making prismatic finishes possible, etc.), she writes, "As economic optimism coincides with a tumultuous cultural and political landscape, its no wonder the art and design world is embracing the dreamlike and surreal.  At this point, we may as well coat the world in an iridescent glaze, if only to enjoy the illusion."  Just to put in my two cents, I'd add that the holographic trend's popularity is owed simply to its sheer prettiness and versatility - after playing with many of these items, I can say the effect of prismatic makeup can be subtly ethereal, or you can layer a bunch of product to go full-on rainbow.

What do you think?  Are you game for holographic makeup or is it not your thing?


Curator's Corner, 3/19/2017

CC logoHappy (almost) spring!  Here's your bi-weekly link roundup.

- Three huge beauty news items:  1.  MAC will be available at Ulta.  Now if they would just come to Sephora I'd be a happy girl. 2. There is an entire '90s inspired makeup line.  How perfect would I be to create products for it?!  3.  Urban Decay will be launching a Basquiat collection on April 20.  I'm glad that the potential issues with this collection were mostly addressed...but I'll be sure to expand on this when I get the whole collection in my greedy little paws!

- Speaking of paws, you can now smell like kitten fur

- Lipstick is so pretty to look at, even under a microscope.

- This is a great followup to my brief post on makeup packaging recycling.

- In beauty history, Collector's Weekly had an excellent profile of hallowed brand Santa Maria Novella

- Here's some evidence of what I've known for years (and one of the major reasons I love makeup).

- A friendly reminder not to use LUSH bath bombs as highlighter.  File this under WHY??  With the spate of highlighters flooding the market at all price points I have no idea why you'd try to use a bath product as one.

- Again, WHY??

The random:

- In '90s nostalgia, Hanson has announced a tour, while Mental Floss unravels the history of those bizarre Mentos commercials. (I wish they also had a history of the Snapple lady.) Meanwhile, musicians reflect on the legacy of Biggie Smalls in honor of the 20-year anniversary of his passing, while in more upbeat news, I'm celebrating the 20th birthday of one of the many great albums by my favorite band.  Birthday wishes are also in order for Buffy the Vampire Slayer (20) and My Cousin Vinny (25).

- Will mermaid-inspired eats replace the unicorn food trend?  I hope so.

- This new fashion museum sounds great but I kinda wish Chanel would donate $6 million to my museum - you'd think they'd want their cosmetics line to be preserved along with their clothing, right?

- Yas queen!!

How have you been?  Are you excited for spring?

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It's 5 o'clock somewhere: boozy makeup packaging

I remember thinking how cute and novel these wine bottle-shaped lipsticks were when they were making a sensation back in the fall.  (I do have one on the way but the package somehow keeps getting delayed so here's a stock photo for now.)  I'm not a wine person - gives me a horrible headache - but I do appreciate adorable makeup packaging so this gets a thumbs-up from me.  I mean on the one hand I'm not fond of wine once again being associated with a clichéd feminine stereotype (all ladies love wine, shopping, chocolate and shoes, amirite?), but on the other hand, this lipstick is just too cute.

Chateau Labiotte wine lipstick
(image from beautyboxkorea.com)

Turns out, this isn't the first time lipstick has been designed to resemble booze.  I was positively tickled when, during one of my customary Friday night vintage makeup searches on Etsy (I lead a very exciting life, I know), I came across this miniature lipstick cleverly packaged as a whiskey bottle.

Carstairs miniature whiskey bottle lipstick

Carstairs miniature whiskey bottle lipstick

Carstairs miniature whiskey bottle lipstick

It really is mini!

Carstairs miniature whiskey bottle lipstick

I'd never heard of Carstairs before, but apparently from roughly the '40s through the '60s they did a good amount of advertising for their White Seal whiskey, which is still sold today.  In addition to the lipsticks, they offered mini screwdrivers and toothpicks, along with seal clock figurines and the usual print advertising.  According to one (no longer active) ebay listing, the lipstick bottles started being produced around 1944 and other listings say they're from the '50s, so I guess they were used as promotional items for a few decades.  Here's a photo of one in Madeleine Marsh's excellent book, which also dates it to the '50s. 

Carstairs miniature whiskey bottle lipstick in Compacts and Cosmetics by Madeleine Marsh

I'm guessing that for the most part, the lipsticks were provided to bars and liquor stores and given away as a small gift-with-purchase, as there are quite a few full boxes of them floating around. I would have bought this one in a heartbeat because how cute would it have been to display it alongside a whole Chateau Labiotte set?

Vintage Carstairs whiskey lipstick set

Chateau Labiotte set(images from etsy.com and labiotte.us)

But the individual lipsticks are obviously a lot cheaper and I have many things I want to purchase for the summer exhibition, so I had to pass for now. ;)  As for the lipstick itself, a company called Christy Cosmetics, Inc. was responsible for producing it.  I couldn't find much information about it online, other than it was a New York-based company and was also the manufacturer of a line called Diana Deering (who was an entirely fictional character, or, as the patent puts it, "fanciful".)

Christy Cosmetics ad, 1944(image from what-i-found.blogspot.com)

Diana Deering ad, 1944

Diana Deering/Christy Cosmetics patent(image from tsdrapi.uspto.gov)

I'm sure there's information about Christy out there somewhere, but as usual I lack the time and other resources to do proper research, i.e., looking beyond Google.  If anyone knows anything about their relationship with Carstairs and how they were chosen to produce their promo items I'd love to hear it.

Uh-oh, we have a situation here.  Once again a certain little Sailor is up to no good.  "It's just my size!" 

Bottoms up!

I better go get this wrapped up and into storage before he smears it all over his face in attempt to "drink" the non-existent whiskey.  In any case, Happy St. Patrick's Day and I hope these lipsticks have inspired you to let your hair down and enjoy some adult beverages tonight!